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June 15, 2012
First Presidential Proclamation Recognizing World Elder Abuse Awareness Day
THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
________________________________________
For Immediate Release June 14, 2012

WORLD ELDER ABUSE AWARENESS DAY, 2012

- - - - - - -

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Every American deserves the chance to live out the full measure of their days in health and security. Yet, every year, millions of older Americans are denied that most basic opportunity due to abuse, neglect, or exploitation. On World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, we call attention to this global public health issue, and we rededicate ourselves to providing our elders the care and protection they deserve.

Victims of elder abuse are parents and grandparents, neighbors and friends. Elder abuse cuts across race, gender, culture, and circumstance, and whether physical, emotional, or financial, it takes an unacceptable toll on individuals and families across our Nation. Seniors who experience abuse or neglect face a heightened risk of health complications and premature death, while financial exploitation can rob men and women of the security they have built over a lifetime. Tragically, many older Americans suffer in silence, burdened by fear, shame, or impairments that prevent them from speaking out about abuse.

We owe it to our seniors to expose elder abuse wherever we find it and take action to bring it to an end. Two years ago, I was proud to sign the Elder Justice Act, which was included in the Affordable Care Act, and marked a major step forward in the fight against elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. With the Department of Health and Human Services, we are partnering with State and local authorities to ensure seniors can live their lives with dignity and independence. With the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, we are working to empower older Americans with tools and information to navigate safely through financial challenges. And with the Department of Justice, we are protecting older Americans by prosecuting those who would target and exploit them.

Every day, State and local agencies, protective services professionals, law enforcement officers, private and non-profit organizations, and leaders throughout our communities help protect older Americans from abuse and provide care to those who have already been affected. Together, all of us can play a role in addressing this public health crisis that puts millions at risk. Today, let us keep faith with a generation of Americans by speaking out against elder abuse, advancing justice for victims, and building a Nation that preserves and protects the well-being of all who call it home.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 15, 2012, as World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this day by learning the signs of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation, and by raising awareness about this public health issue.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand twelve, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth.

BARACK OBAMA

 

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD)

Below you'll find ideas for raising awareness on June 15 and a selection of the ongoing activities and programs carried out by the United States Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women Enhanced Training and Services to End Violence and Abuse of Women Later in Life (ALL) Program grantees’ in their own communities to improve victim safety, increase abuser accountability, and expand community awareness of the problem of elder abuse. A downloadable PDF of these ideas may also be found here.

IDEAS FOR RAISING AWARENESS ON JUNE 15

  • Host a public awareness event geared toward seniors.
  • Send out a press release, hold a press conference, or submit an editorial to discuss elder abuse awareness and prevention efforts.
  • Host a conference or training focused on elder abuse awareness and available community resources.
  • Develop a PSA on elder abuse with a local TV or radio station.
  • Be a guest speaker on elder abuse for a local radio show.
  • Create a poster on elder abuse or use a poster created by a national or international organization like the Center of Excellence on Elder Abuse and Neglect, NCALL, or INPEA to display in your community.
  • Host a public awareness activity that includes politicians, seniors, local programs, survivors of abuse, and others.
  • Ask local leaders, e.g., Mayor, County Executive, and Governor, to release a proclamation declaring June 15 as Elder Abuse Awareness Day.

ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMS TO RAISE AWARENESS EVERYDAY

  • Visit an elderly neighbor who lives alone.
  • Volunteer for a program or organization that benefits seniors.
  • Educate yourself and others about elder abuse.
  • Hold monthly coordinated community response team meetings to identify gaps in services for older victims and conduct needs assessments.
  • Create a collective protocol for systems- and community-based organizations to rely upon when responding to older victims.
  • Develop outreach strategies to increase collaboration with faith communities.
  • Develop common messaging about elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation.
  • Host ongoing, topic-specific trainings on elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation.
  • Host regularly occurring programs for long-term residential facilities to address issues affecting seniors, including elder abuse and sexual assault, e.g., “Tea and Tips.”
  • Work with adult foster care homes, continuing care retirement communities, or long term care residential facilities to establish emergency housing options for older victims.
  • Hold media appearances on local news and current events programming (both broadcast television and public radio) to discuss the problem of elder abuse.
  • Present a workshop on elder abuse/community resources at a related community partner’s event.
  • Develop outreach strategies to raise awareness of available elder abuse resources in your community.

2012 PUBLIC AWARENESS

  • Presidential Proclamation: World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, 2012
  • Bea Hansen, Acting Director of the United States Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women (OVW): World Elder Abuse Awareness Day
  • Sebelius: Fighting abuse of senior citizens, USA Today, June 13, 2012
  • United Nations Secretary-General's Message, June 2012
  • Ageless Alliance: Elder Abuse Advocacy Group Launched on June 14, 2012
    Mary Twomey, Co-Director of the University of California/Irvine's Center for Excellence on Elder Abuse and Neglect, announced the creation of a new grassroots effort to address elder abuse. The purpose of this social justice movement is to connect people of all ages and backgrounds to identify, prevent and eliminate elder abuse and neglect in our society. For more information about Ageless Alliance, please visit: www.agelessalliance.org.


WEAAD 2012 EVENTS/ACTIVITIES

  • June 14: Symposium on Elder Abuse
    This year the White House Office of Public Engagement, in collaboration with federal partners from the Administration for Community Living/Department of Health and Human Services, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the Department of Justice, is hosting a day-long symposium in recognition of the 7th annual World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. The event is being held the White House on June 14, 2012 to highlight the problem of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. The day will be divided into four sessions to be webcast live on the White House website (http://www.whitehouse.gov/live/white-house-event-elder-abuse-and-financial-exploitation), and will include social media-based interactive question and answer sessions on Twitter and Facebook.
    For more information on the event, please visit the World Elder Abuse Awareness Day page on the website of the Administration on Aging.

  • June 11-15: Elders Matter: The Two Cents Tweet Up
    Join the NSVRC the week of June 11 in tweeting about WEAAD. Sexual violence can happen to anyone but adults in later life are particularly vulnerable. To spread light on this issue, improve response, and promote effective prevention of sexual violence at all stages of life, NSVRC asks you to throw your two cents into the mix. They'll be sharing stories and resources all week, leading up to the worldwide awareness day on June 15. Join the conversation and share your stories and resources with the hashtags: #my2cents and #eldersmatter. Please contact resources@nsvrc.org with any questions you have on how to participate in this event.

  • June 15: DVAM BlogTalkRadio Presents: WEAAD: Lessons from Older Survivors of Abuse
    This year, the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence connects with the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life and a few very courageous survivors willing to share their stories. This 30-minute program will explore how to best meet the needs of older survivors of abuse and how local domestic violence programs can be of support in their journey of healing. To join, please click on the following link: http://bit.ly/NRCDV-WEAAD2012 on Friday, June 15 at 3:00 pm (Eastern)/2:00 p.m. (Central). Listen to a live stream of program and share questions or comments using the online text chat.

  • June 15: Working Together to End Abuse in Later Life in Latin@ Communities
    The National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities and Casa de Esperanza, in conjunction with the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), will be hosting a 30-minute BlogTalkRadio session on June 15, at 2:00 pm (Eastern) in observance of World Elder Abuse Awareness day. In this 30 minutes session, presenters will discuss the specific and unique needs of Latin@ victims of elder abuse as this group is especially underrepresented in research and practice. Best approaches for bridging this gap as well as examples of successful collaborations to address this problem will be highlighted. Presenters include: Dr. Yvonne Lozano, Assistant Professor, Texas State University; Rosie Hidalgo, Director of Public Policy, National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities/Casa de Esperanza; and Dr. Yanira Cruz, President and CEO of the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA). The session will be moderated by Heidi Notario-Smull, Training & Technical Assistance Coordinator, National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities/Casa de Esperanza. To register please visit: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/N2F3T9D.

  • To help spread the word about what is going on throughout the country, the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA) is collecting reports from individuals and organizations about what events and activities they are planning for World Elder Abuse Awareness Day 2012. Please visit their web page for more information.
RESOURCES
  • The International Network for Prevention of Elder Abuse (INPEA)
    INPEA produced the Elder Abuse Awareness Community Guide Tool Kit (PDF). This Tool Kit provides sample ideas and templates for activities and examples of materials, resources, proclamations, and messages. Additionally, INPEA’s WEAAD web page features logos, posters, a fact sheet on elder abuse and other resources to promote WEAAD.
  • National Adult Protective Services Resource Center (NAPSRC) offers several resources, including the video: Color My World Free From Elder Abuse, a fact sheet on Adult Protective Services, elder abuse statistics, and an example event poster.
  • National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA)
    AoA’s NCEA website contains many resources to help you find assistance, publications, data, information, and answers about elder abuse. For information and ideas about World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, visit the “Take a Stand in the Fight Against Elder Abuse” section of the website.
  • Safe Havens Interfaith Partnership Against Domestic Violence and the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life (NCALL)
  • By building collaborative partnerships, faith leaders and service providers can strengthen the support that victims receive and work together to help victims find hope and safety. In April 2012, Safe Havens Interfaith Partnership Against Domestic Violence and NCALL facilitated an Elder Abuse and Faith Summit in Chicago, IL, funded by the U. S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. The following document summarizes the group's assessment of current collaborations between the faith community and service providers: Seeing with New Eyes: Elder Abuse and Faith.

 

Elder abuse in perspective
Elder abuse in perspective. Biggs, S., C. Phillipson & P. Kingston (1995). Rethinking ageing series. Buckingham, Philadelphia: Open University Press.

Elder abuse: International and cross-cultural perspectives
Elder abuse: International and cross-cultural perspectives. Kosberg, J.I. & J.L. Garcia, eds. (1995). New York: The Haworth Press.

Les mauvais traitements à l’égard des personnes âgéees : un manuel d’intervention
Les mauvais traitements à l’égard des personnes âgéees : un manuel d’intervention (1998). Reis, M. and Nahmiash, D. Presses de l’Université Laval, QC.

National survey on abuse of the elderly in Canada
National survey on abuse of the elderly in Canada. Podnieks, E., K.A. Pillemer, J. Nicholson, T. Shillington & A.F. Frizzell (1989). Toronto: Office of Research and Innovation, Ryerson Polytechnical Institute.

Powerlessness and abuse : A descriptive qualitative study which explores abuse and neglect of older adults in the community in relation to the social context
Powerlessness and abuse : A descriptive qualitative study which explores abuse and neglect of older adults in the community in relation to the social context. Nahmiash, D. (1997). Doctoral dissertation, Quebec, Laval University.

Understanding and combating elder abuse in minority communities
Understanding and combating elder abuse in minority communities. Nerenberg, L. (1998). «Culturally specific approach», in Prevratil, J.F. & T. Tatara (eds), 152-167. Philanthropy Services Inc. ISBN 1-892197-00-6.

When Seniors are Abused: A Guide to Intervention
When Seniors are Abused: A Guide to Intervention (1995). Reis, M. and Nahmiash, D. Captus Press, North York, ON (captpres@iio.org), provides descriptions of screening tools and intervention models.

American Prosecutors Research Institute

The American Prosecutors Research Institute was established in 1984 by the Board of Directors of the National District Attorneys Association to provide practical and direct services to prosecutors and allied professionals. The staff of APRI includes experienced prosecutors who can provide information concerning the prosecution of cases involving elderly victims and refer callers to local prosecutors with expertise in elder abuse.

Contact:
APRI Crimes Against the Family Division
99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510
Alexander, VA 22314
Telephone: (703) 549-4253
Fax: (703) 836-3195
Website: http://www.ndaa.org/apri/Index.html

Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE)

The Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE), operated by the College of Human Resources of the University of Delaware operates the Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE), is the nation's largest and most utilized computerized collection of elder abuse materials and resources. Using over 100 keywords, it produces annotated bibliographies for professionals and the public. Computerized searches of over 3,000 holdings are conducted for $5.00-$10.00 per search, which includes handling and postage charges. Searches are usually conducted within 48 hours after receiving requests.

Contact:
Karen Stein, Ph.D., Director
CANE
College of Human Resources
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716
Telephone: (302) 831-3525
Fax: (302) 831-6081
email: Karen.Stein@mvs.udel.edu

Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly/American Bar Association

The Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly, operates NCEA's listserve, which provides a 24-hour, 7-days-a-week on-line connection to others working on elder abuse issues. Subscribers send email questions, announcements, or discussion topics to the listserve; their message are automatically distributed by email to all others on the subscribers list. Anyone can reply and every subscriber sees all the messages (unless they choose to email privately.) This listserve is for practitioners, administrators, educators, health professionals, researchers, law enforcement, advocates, the legal professions and policy makers. It's easy to subscribe by contacting the list manager by email: lstiegel@staff.abanet.org. Subscription requests must include each potential subscriber's name, e-mail address, profession, and a statement explaining their interest in elder abuse issues. The Commission also monitors and examines state laws on elder abuse and has produced the following publications:

Elder Abuse in the State Courts: Three Curricula for Judges and Court Staff (1997). Contains three interdisciplinary curricula, a Conferees' Manual and bibliography, templates for overhead transparencies, sample hypotheticals and evaluation questionnaires, and resource information for use in training judges and court staff about elder abuse and domestic violence in later life. A very limited number of free copies are available from the Commission for distribution to persons/organizations that will use the curricula for the purpose for which it was intended. To request a copy of the curricula manual, contact the Commission to provide an explanation of why you would like to receive the book.

Recommended Guidelines for State Courts Handling Cases Involving Elder Abuse (1996, 164 pp). Provides 29 recommendations drawn from experts in the field. Also includes over 100 pages of charts describing states' statutes related to protective services, institutional abuse, long-term care ombudsman programs, and criminal abuse.

For more information or to order materials, contact:
The American Bar Association Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly
1800 M Street, N.W.
Washington D.C. 20036-5886
Phone: (202) 331-2297
Fax: (202) 331-2220
Email: lstiegel@staff.abanet.org

Goldman Institute on Aging/ San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention (partner in the National Center on Elder Abuse)

The San Francisco Consortium is a coalition of agencies that have formally agreed to work together to improve San Francisco's professional response to abuse. In addition, the Consortium is a resource to communities across the United States, providing training, consultation, technical assistance, and materials. The GIOA has produced the following publications:

Victims' Rights and Services: Assisting Elderly Crime Victims (1999, 29 pp) $15.00. As more cases of elder abuse are prosecuted, it is critical for advocates and service providers who work with the elderly to understand victims' rights and special needs. This manual is intended to increase service providers' understanding of how crime affects victims' emotional and service needs.

Prosecution and Protection: Understanding the Criminal Justice System's Role in Preventing Elder Abuse (1998, 26 pp) $15.00. This manual is designed to demystify the criminal justice system for health and social service professionals who work with the elderly and to encourage them to participate more fully in the criminal justice process.

Communities Uniting: Volunteers in Elder Abuse Prevention (1997, 24 pp) $15.00. This manual describes some of the contributions volunteers are currently making in the field of elder abuse prevention, recommends issues to consider in determining the need for volunteers, presents the fundamentals of volunteer management, describes available resources, and offers sample materials and tips from existing programs.

Domestic Violence and the Elderly: a Cross Training Curriculum in Elder Abuse and Domestic Violence. (1998). $15.00 This is a training curriculum for service providers in both aging and domestic violence to train them on issues around older battered women. It includes basic information on domestic violence, sexual assault, elder abuse, and aging. While this curriculum was developed for the San Francisco community, it can be easily adapted for other communities.

Serving the Older Battered Woman: A Conference Planning Guide (1997, 59 pp + appendices). $28.00. This guide to planning and conducting a conference for community professionals from the fields of aging, domestic violence, law enforcement, health care, and legal services provides instruction in:

Introducing both domestic violence and elder abuse
The interface between domestic violence and elder abuse
Conducting interdisciplinary workshops
Developing a "blueprint" for serving older battered women
Financial Abuse of the Elderly (1996, 28 pp). $15.00. Of all forms of elder abuse, financial exploitation may be the most difficult to grasp because the problem itself is poorly defined. Evaluating whether or not financial abuse has occurred often involves complex and subjective determinations. This manual provides an overview of the problem, describes the challenges it poses, and profiles promising intervention strategies.

Older Battered Women: Integrating Aging and Domestic Violence Services (1996, 28 pp). $15.00. For many years elderly battered women have fallen between the cracks of the elder abuse and domestic violence systems. This manual, intended for domestic violence advocates and service providers who work with the elderly, takes a step toward rectifying the situation by describing the service needs of the older battered woman and profiling innovative programs around the country. It also provides a general introduction to domestic violence.

Building Partnerships: A Guide to Developing Coalitions, Interagency Agreements and Teams in the Field of Elder Abuse (1995, 24 pp) $15.00. This guide provides practical advice in how to promote partnerships among those who share a common interest in protecting the health, safety, property, and civil liberties of the elderly.

To Reach Beyond Our Grasp: A Community Outreach Guide for Professionals in the Field of Elder Abuse (1995, 20 pp). $15.00. This manual looks at culture, tradition, values, and language to understand the mistreatment of elders in a broader and increasingly diverse community.

For more information, or to order materials, contact:
The San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention
Institute on Aging
2700 Geary Boulevard San Francisco, CA 94118
(415) 447-1989, X513
email: elderabuseprevention@ioaging.org
Website: http://www.ioaging.org

National Adult Protective Services Administrators (NAAPSA)

The National Adult Protective Services Administrators (NAPSA) is a membership organization established in the mid-1980s. Its mission is to improve the quality and availability of services for disabled and at-risk adults and elderly persons who are abused, neglected, or exploited, and other vulnerable adults who are unable to protect their own interests. This is accomplished through advocacy at the national level and by assisting state and local administrators secure technical assistance, develop resources, and educate the public and legislative bodies about the needs of dependent adults. Membership is available to APS administrators at the state and local level and their staff; administrators of public agencies and organizations that exhibits an interest in APS and the objectives of NAPSA; and agencies involved in the provision of APS or interested in the objectives of NAPSA.Membership benefits include a newsletter, membership directory, and an annual conference.

NAPSA has produced the following publications:

A National Study of Self-Neglecting Adult Protective Services Clients.(1991, 30 pp). National Association of Adult Protective Service Administrators. Includes information collected from 30 states, profiles self-neglecting clients referred to APS, and includes a discussion implications.

Adult Protective Services Compilation of Workload Studies and Caseload Data (1997, 9 pp). National Association of Adult Protective Service Administrators. Data from 26 APS programs. Provides recommended caseloads, current average caseloads, and average length of time APS cases are open, as well as a list of state contacts.

Report by the Adult Services Task Force on the Perspective of the States on a Federal Adult Protective Services Statute (1995, 143 pp). National Association of Adult Protective Service Administrators. Includes APS eligibility issues, services to be included in a model federal APS statute, service access and reporting issues, service delivery and coordination issues, funding and administration, and survey respondents. Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia participated in the survey.

A National Study of Involuntary Protective Services to Adult Protective Services Clients (1993, 42 pp):This study presents information derived from 42 states on providing protective services without the consent of the client. The survey found that although most states have the ability to provide involuntary services, over 90% of APS clients consent to services.

For more information or to purchase materials, contact:
National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA)
Joanne Otto, Executive Director
1900 13th Street
Suite 303
Boulder, CO 80302
Phone: (720) 565-0906
Fax: (720) 565-0438
E-Mail: joanne.otto@naapsa.org

National Association of Bunco Investigators (NABI)

The National Association of Bunco Investigators, Inc. is a non-profit organization of law enforcement and associated professionals dedicated to the investigation and apprehension of con artists and transient criminals. Members have developed extensive knowledge in the investigation of Bunco crimes, which include pigeon drops, bank examiner schemes, sweetheart scams, etc. NABI facilitates the continuous exchange of information by publishing a bulletin, which provides up to date information on criminals. It also provides a forum for the dissemination of information on suspects wanted by law enforcement agencies around the country. To date, the information disseminated through NABI has helped in the identification of over 2,000 criminal suspects.

For more information, contact:
NABI
P.O. Box 287
Maryland Line, MD 21105

National Association of State Units on Aging

NASUA serves as lead agency in the National Center on Elder Abuse (see produces and disseminates information on domestic and institutional elder abuse, publishes a monthly newsletter, and operates a website, which includes basic information, a publications list, frequently asked questions, and linkages to NCEA partners and other organizations involved in elder abuse prevention. NASUA has produced the following materials:

Fact Sheets
Types of abuse in domestic settings
Trends in abuse in domestic settings
Reporting abuse in domestic settings
Older battered women fact sheet
Institutional Abuse Training Resources (1998, 4 pp). Annotated bibliography of elder abuse training resources (including videos and training manuals) relevant to professionals and paraprofessionals working in institutional settings.
States Keep the Dream Alive: Elder Rights and Minority Initiatives (1997, 142 pp). Thirty-three states' three most effective and/or important legislative and programmatic elder rights and minority efforts.
Structure and Utilization of Adult Abuse Registries in Selected States (1997, 57 pp). Discusses scope, due process, employers' checking mandates, registry management, and issues and ideas related to adult abuse registries, using examples from nine states. Appendices include some sample forms.
Summaries of the Statistical Data on Elder Abuse in Domestic Settings for FY95 and FY96 (1997, 33 pp)
Getting Out...The Word (1994 to 1998, 23 pp) Set of nine elder abuse public education "tip sheets" covering: how to deal with media requests to interview a victim; linking elder abuse education efforts to current events; peer resources; radio PSAs; domestic violence awareness month; dealing with television reporters; communicating accessibly; handling public appearances; and using roleplays.
Elder Abuse and State Courts (Teleconference Report) (1996, 29 pp)
Elder Abuse Registries (Teleconference Report) (1995, 11 pp)
Addressing Elder Abuse with American Indian Tribes (Teleconference Report) (1995, 17 pp)
Confidentiality Dilemmas (Roundtable Discussion) (1994, 11 pp)
Training Bankers about Financial Exploitation (Teleconference Report) (1994, 5 pp) Joining the Anti-Violence/Family Violence Campaigns (Teleconference Report) (1994, 8 pp) Training Law Enforcement Professionals about Elder Abuse (Teleconference report) (1994, 6 pp)
Elder Abuse: Questions and Answers -- An Information Guide for Professionals and Concerned Citizens (1996 [sixth edition], 28 pp) This publication is designed to help professionals working with older people to enhance their awareness of the problem of abuse, neglect and exploitation of America's elderly. It provides basic information in a question and answer format, including: the origins, causes and incidence of elder abuse on both the national and state levels; victim and perpetrator characteristics; and an explanation of the services available to victims, families and at-risk elders. This publication was originally developed and printed under grant #90-AM-0332 from the Administration on Aging to the American Public Welfare Association. Also available in Spanish.
Inventory of Elder Abuse Coordination Projects (1995, approx. 100 pp). Indexed descriptions of 57 elder abuse coordination projects, including agencies involved, project dates, problem the project was designed to address, goals and target audience(s), activities, and contact person.
Elder Abuse Video Resources: A Guide for Training and Education (1995, 107 pp). This guide is a resource for staff training and public education on elder abuse. It provides a listing of videos reviewed by Center staff up to Spring of 1995. The descriptions contain a summary of the content, suggested target audience(s), format, length, price and information about where and how to obtain the video.
Elder Abuse Training Priorities: Targets, Opportunities, and Strategies: Highlights of a National Survey and Recommendations of Two Expert Panels (1993, 130 pp). Results and recommendations resulting from a survey of 101 elder abuse and legal services professionals and 166 "related professionals" such as physicians, law enforcement officers, and bankers) of their elder abuse training needs.
NARCEA Exchange FrontLine articles
2a: Interviewing Sexual Abuse Victims with Developmental Disabilities (1991)
2b: Banks and Their Responsibilities to Report Financial Exploitation (1991)
2c: Working with Abuse Victims with Developmental Disabilities (1991)
2d: Legal Authorities for APS Practice (1990)
2e: Financial Abuse and Legal Assistance (1990)
2f: Networking with Physicians (1990)
2g: Working with the Criminal Justice System (1990)
2h: Assessment and Intervention (1989)
"The Vexing Problem of Elder Abuse," Public Welfare (1988, 44 pp). A feature issue of Public Welfare, the Journal of the American Public Welfare Association, this compilation of articles examines the problem of elder abuse and neglect from the diverse perspectives of practitioners, law makers and the academic community. It includes a retrospective of national elder abuse policy evolution (up to 1988) and compares some of the important issues in the elder abuse field with those in child abuse. The inherent tensions between individual rights and societal responsibility for protection of vulnerable persons is discussed.
Contact:
National Association of State Units on Aging
1225 I Street, N.W., Suite 725
Washington, D.C. 20005
Telephone: (202) 898-2578
email: NCEA@nasua.org

National Center for Victims of Crime

The National Center for Victims of Crime is resource and advocacy center for victims of crime. Among the issues the center has advocated for is greater attention to victims of financial crime and abuse. The Center's affiliate Bar Association provides referrals to attorneys with expertise in representing crime victims. They also provide training and assistance to lawyers including access to a computerized database of over 11,000 civil appellate cases and court decisions concerning crime victims, a network of expert witnesses and consultants, and two publications--Crime Liability Monthly and the Victim Advocate.

For more information, contact:
National Center for Victims of Crime
2111 Wilson Blvd. Suite 300
Arlington, VA 22201
Phone: (703) 276-2880
Fax: (703) 276-2889
Website: http://www.ncvc.org/main/main.htm

National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA)

The National Center on Elder Abuse was established in 1993 to provide information, data, and expertise to federal, state and local agencies, professionals, and the public. It is operated as a partnership between six organizations, with the National Association of State Units on Aging (NASUA) serving as the lead agency. Other partners in NCEA include the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA); the Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE), operated by the College of Human Resources of the University of Delaware; the San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention at the Goldman Institute on Aging; the National Association of Adult Protective Service Administrators; and the Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly of the American Bar Association. See sections on individual partners for more information.

Contact:
National Center on Elder Abuse
1225 I Street, N.W., Suite 725
Washington, D.C. 20005
Telephone: (202) 898-2578
email: NCEA@nasua.org
Website: http://www.elderabusecenter.org

The National Clearinghouse on Domestic Violence in Later Life

Operated by the Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence, this resource center provides materials and technical assistance on domestic violence in later life. Among the publications they produce, are the following:

Elder Abuse (including domestic violence in later life): Potential Legal Remedies. This booklet provides information about potential criminal justice and civil actions to assist victims of elder abuse and the professionals that work with them.

Elder Abuse, Neglect, and Family Violence: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Provides general information about elder abuse, a flow chart to respond to suspected abuse, and specific tips on what health care providers can do. It lists common signs and symptoms, answers commonly asked questions, and identifies interventions.

Safety Planning for Victims of Domestic Abuse. A brochure for domestic abuse victims of any age who may be abused by or afraid of their spouse/partner; boy/girlfriend; adult child or other family member. It provides instruction in planning for safety in advance of potentially dangerous situations.

Financial Safety Planning for Older Women. This publication addresses the financial obstacles that prevent battered older women from leaving abusive relationships and how to overcome those obstacles.

Developing Services for Older Abuse Women A Guide for Domestic Abuse Programs (1997). This publication, intended for domestic violence advocates, describes the special service needs of battered older women.

For more information and instructions in how to order publications, contact:
The Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence
307 South Paterson, Suite #1
Madison, WI 53703
Phone:(608)255-0539
Fax:(608)255-3560
Email: wcadv@inxpress.net (Subject line: NCALL)

National Organization of Triads, Inc (NATI)

National Association of Triads, Inc. (NATI) provides advice, support, technical assistance, and training to local Triads. Created in 1988 as a partnership between the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), Triad is a network of local programs that promote collaboration between senior volunteers and law enforcement. At present, approximately 730 counties have Triads. Local Triads are overseen by Salt (Senior and Law Enforcement Together) councils, which plan activities and programs to address local needs. NATI hosts training events and a national conference, manages a speaker's bureau, and produces a quarterly newsletter. It distributes guidebooks, information packets, and an informational video on how to get started.

For more information, contact:
NATI
1450 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 800-424-7827
Fax: 703-519-8567
website: http://www.sheriffs.org/triad.htm

National Long Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center

The National Long Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center supports the development and operation of long-term care ombudsman programs across the country through technical assistance, consultation, and information dissemination. It also facilitates communication about timely issues, program needs, and resources among state ombudsman programs and assists states in promoting public awareness about ombudsman programs.

Contact:
National Long Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center
c/o National Citizen's Coalition for Nursing Home Reform
1424 16th Street NW, Suite 202
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 332-2275
Fax: (202) 332-2949
Website: http://www.nccnhr.org/

 

Links.

Advanced Health Care Decisions

Powers of Attorney

Wills, Trusts, and Estates

Funerals

  • The Funeral Rule: A set of rules established by the Federal Trade Commission to protect consumers of funeral goods.
  • Funeral Fraud: Those who understand their consumer rights can prevent funeral fraud.

Guardianships

Medical and Health Insurance

  • Medicare: Extensive information on Medicare.
  • Medicaid Rules: Learn more about Medicaid for elderly people in this website.
  • Understanding HIPAA: Find out why elderly people need to understand their rights under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

Medicaid in Nursing Homes

Long Term Care Financing

  • The CLASS Act: An overview of the Community Living Assistance Services and Support program, or CLASS act.

Social Security

Income Assistance

Consumer Issues

Elder Abuse

Elderly Resources:

End Abuse
- The Family Violence Prevention Fund - The Family Violence Prevention Fund works to prevent violence within the home, and in the community, to help those whose lives are devastated by violence because everyone has the right to live free of violence.

Abuse-excuse.com
- Provides resource information and more to parents and others accused of abuse.

Age Concern
- Age Concern supports all people over 50 in the UK , ensuring that they get the most from life. We provide essential services such as day care and information . We campaign on issues like age discrimination and pensions, and work to influence public opinion and government policy about older people.

Elder Care Advocates
- We provide professional care planning and care supervision for seniors no matter what their health status or living environment.

Family Care Support
- The purpose of this site is to provide support and information for the family caregiver or anyone that needs health related information.

Nursing Home Abuse Lawyer
- Missouri Attorney Michael Fatall represents victims of nursing home abuse.

Adult Care Providers
- This Site was created to assist persons needing to find quality elderly care sources. We update the listings daily for your convenience. Our references contain sources for quality care and excellent service.

Elder Care Referral Services
- experienced in helping seniors find housing that fits a wide variety of assisted living facilities, alzheimer's care residences, small residential care homes, and independent retirement communities for seniors.

Senior Services Of Northern Kentucky
- An agency of compassion. Here older adults and their caregivers will find the resources they need to insure a healthy and fruitful life while remaining independent.

Retirement With a Purpose
- Online retirement ideas and resources. Retirement hobbies, travel ideas, health concerns and solution, good clean jokes and lots more.

Elder care Column
- a selection of my columns, links to my favorite elder care sites, my professional information, and a guestbook for your comments.
Enjoy the site and I invite your comments.

Senior Resources Inc
- Providing coordinated services, resources and personal choices to promote healthy, independent living for senior citizens in the Midlands of South Carolina. We touch the lives of over 2,000 Midlands' resident every day through our programs, volunteers and services.

Vital Link
- Our Mission is to provide the senior and disabled communities with medical alarm services that enhance their safety, independence, and peace of mind.

Senior Resources Group
- We specialize in helping seniors and their families face today's challenges. We work closely with you to help you find the right solution and save you time, energy and frustration.

Empire Homecare Resources
- Empire Home Care is a health care support service for aging parents, seniors, family members, nurses, caregivers, family members, and those concerned about future disability, sickness, or injury. Our goal is to offer assistance through research, training, and education to improve the quality of life and function of adults, and to promote independence and dignity.

Aurora Health Care
- Aurora is a not-for-profit Wisconsin health care provider and a nationally recognized leader in improving the quality of health care.

Friendly4Seniors.com - Searchable online senior resource for seniors, family members and healthcare professionals.

ElderCareColumn.com
- Mary B. Moorhead's site helping families solve their elder care challenges by resolving unexpected crises and developing long term care plans.

Aging Parents and Elder Care
- Advice, comprehensive checklists, and links to key resources ... designed to make it easier for caregivers to quickly find the information they need ... and avoid missing things that are important in the care for their loved one.

Caregiver.com
- Caregiver Media Group is a leading provider of information, support and guidance for family and professional caregivers.

CarePathways.com
was created by RNs to help families find the best care and living arrangements for their aging parents. On-line access to Inspection Reports of all USA Medicare/Medicaid Nursing Homes and Evaluations of Assisted Living and Retirement homes.

Elder Life Planning
- Eldercare Resources for Family Caregivers. Information about long term care, home health care, Assisted living and nursing homes. Senior Settlements and long term care insurance. Informed Decisions, Inc. is a private company dedicated to helping people make the best choices for long term elder care of their relatives. Experts in Long Term Care insurance and Elder Care planning.

National Organization For Empowering Caregivers
-Charitable non-profit organization which provides assistance; education, support and referrals for informal family caregivers, as well as to promote public awareness about the realities of those who care for loved ones.

Physician Jobs
- With thousands of physician job opportunities available nationwide, the team of professional physician recruiters at DocJobsOnline ® is dedicated to helping physicians find rewarding positions!

New LifeStyles Online
- The Source for Seniors. You complete guide to senior housing and care. Listing all state licensed senior communities and care agencies nationwide. Search online or order a free print guide to find a retirement community, assisted living, nursing home, Alzheimer's care, home care, and more.

Elder Abuse Prevention
- A Consortium Serving Alameda and Contra Costa Counties in California, USA. Elder Abuse Prevention has been active since 1984 as the only non-profit 501(c) (3) agency in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties whose sole focus is the prevention of elder abuse.

National Center On Elder Abuse
- The Source of Information and Assistance on Elder Abuse.

Swindle.org
- A Bay Area Guide to Understanding and Preventing Elder Abuse.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
- Formerly the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Provides practical health care information, research findings, and data to help consumers, health providers, health insurers, researchers, and policymakers make informed decisions about health care issues.

Mr. LTC
- Provides LTC news and information. Includes resources for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, heart disease, and other long term illnesses.

Alzheimer Research Forum
- A scientific knowledge base on Alzheimer disease, with research news, expert commentaries, and databases for peer-reviewed articles, drugs, research reagents, grants, jobs, conferences, and more.

California Personal Injury Lawyer
- Experienced attorneys in wrongful death, product liability, nursing home abuse, auto accident and brain injury.

PI Los Angeles Attorneys, Lawyers and Law Firms
- Los Angeles Attorneys specializing in personal injury claims, car accident, serious injury, auto accidents, slip fall injury, insurance settlement.

Emergency Medical Alert, Alarm Systems - Offers emergency medical alert / alarm systems and monitoring bracelets for seniors and elderly.

Our New York personal injury lawyer firm represent the victims of auto injury accidents, slip and fall accidents, construction & work site injuries, medical malpractice, wrongful death, birth injuries and defective products to name a few.

International Resources

Action on Elder Abuse - National organization that operates across the four nations of the British Isles. It is based in London. As a multi-disciplinary membership organisation it aims to prevent the abuse of older people by raising awareness; encouraging education; promoting research; and collecting and disseminating information.

Abuse and Neglect Resources.

Elder abuse in perspective
Elder abuse in perspective. Biggs, S., C. Phillipson & P. Kingston (1995). Rethinking ageing series. Buckingham, Philadelphia: Open University Press.

Elder abuse: International and cross-cultural perspectives
Elder abuse: International and cross-cultural perspectives. Kosberg, J.I. & J.L. Garcia, eds. (1995). New York: The Haworth Press.

Les mauvais traitements à l’égard des personnes âgéees : un manuel d’intervention
Les mauvais traitements à l’égard des personnes âgéees : un manuel d’intervention (1998). Reis, M. and Nahmiash, D. Presses de l’Université Laval, QC.

National survey on abuse of the elderly in Canada
National survey on abuse of the elderly in Canada. Podnieks, E., K.A. Pillemer, J. Nicholson, T. Shillington & A.F. Frizzell (1989). Toronto: Office of Research and Innovation, Ryerson Polytechnical Institute.

Powerlessness and abuse : A descriptive qualitative study which explores abuse and neglect of older adults in the community in relation to the social context
Powerlessness and abuse : A descriptive qualitative study which explores abuse and neglect of older adults in the community in relation to the social context. Nahmiash, D. (1997). Doctoral dissertation, Quebec, Laval University.

Understanding and combating elder abuse in minority communities
Understanding and combating elder abuse in minority communities. Nerenberg, L. (1998). «Culturally specific approach», in Prevratil, J.F. & T. Tatara (eds), 152-167. Philanthropy Services Inc. ISBN 1-892197-00-6.

When Seniors are Abused: A Guide to Intervention
When Seniors are Abused: A Guide to Intervention (1995). Reis, M. and Nahmiash, D. Captus Press, North York, ON (captpres@iio.org), provides descriptions of screening tools and intervention models.

American Prosecutors Research Institute

The American Prosecutors Research Institute was established in 1984 by the Board of Directors of the National District Attorneys Association to provide practical and direct services to prosecutors and allied professionals. The staff of APRI includes experienced prosecutors who can provide information concerning the prosecution of cases involving elderly victims and refer callers to local prosecutors with expertise in elder abuse.

Contact:
APRI Crimes Against the Family Division
99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510
Alexander, VA 22314
Telephone: (703) 549-4253
Fax: (703) 836-3195
Website: http://www.ndaa.org/apri/Index.html

Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE)

The Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE), operated by the College of Human Resources of the University of Delaware operates the Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE), is the nation's largest and most utilized computerized collection of elder abuse materials and resources. Using over 100 keywords, it produces annotated bibliographies for professionals and the public. Computerized searches of over 3,000 holdings are conducted for $5.00-$10.00 per search, which includes handling and postage charges. Searches are usually conducted within 48 hours after receiving requests.

Contact:
Karen Stein, Ph.D., Director
CANE
College of Human Resources
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716
Telephone: (302) 831-3525
Fax: (302) 831-6081
email: Karen.Stein@mvs.udel.edu

Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly/American Bar Association

The Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly, operates NCEA's listserve, which provides a 24-hour, 7-days-a-week on-line connection to others working on elder abuse issues. Subscribers send email questions, announcements, or discussion topics to the listserve; their message are automatically distributed by email to all others on the subscribers list. Anyone can reply and every subscriber sees all the messages (unless they choose to email privately.) This listserve is for practitioners, administrators, educators, health professionals, researchers, law enforcement, advocates, the legal professions and policy makers. It's easy to subscribe by contacting the list manager by email: lstiegel@staff.abanet.org. Subscription requests must include each potential subscriber's name, e-mail address, profession, and a statement explaining their interest in elder abuse issues. The Commission also monitors and examines state laws on elder abuse and has produced the following publications:

Elder Abuse in the State Courts: Three Curricula for Judges and Court Staff (1997). Contains three interdisciplinary curricula, a Conferees' Manual and bibliography, templates for overhead transparencies, sample hypotheticals and evaluation questionnaires, and resource information for use in training judges and court staff about elder abuse and domestic violence in later life. A very limited number of free copies are available from the Commission for distribution to persons/organizations that will use the curricula for the purpose for which it was intended. To request a copy of the curricula manual, contact the Commission to provide an explanation of why you would like to receive the book.

Recommended Guidelines for State Courts Handling Cases Involving Elder Abuse (1996, 164 pp). Provides 29 recommendations drawn from experts in the field. Also includes over 100 pages of charts describing states' statutes related to protective services, institutional abuse, long-term care ombudsman programs, and criminal abuse.

For more information or to order materials, contact:
The American Bar Association Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly
1800 M Street, N.W.
Washington D.C. 20036-5886
Phone: (202) 331-2297
Fax: (202) 331-2220
Email: lstiegel@staff.abanet.org

Goldman Institute on Aging/ San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention (partner in the National Center on Elder Abuse)

The San Francisco Consortium is a coalition of agencies that have formally agreed to work together to improve San Francisco's professional response to abuse. In addition, the Consortium is a resource to communities across the United States, providing training, consultation, technical assistance, and materials. The GIOA has produced the following publications:

Victims' Rights and Services: Assisting Elderly Crime Victims (1999, 29 pp) $15.00. As more cases of elder abuse are prosecuted, it is critical for advocates and service providers who work with the elderly to understand victims' rights and special needs. This manual is intended to increase service providers' understanding of how crime affects victims' emotional and service needs.

Prosecution and Protection: Understanding the Criminal Justice System's Role in Preventing Elder Abuse (1998, 26 pp) $15.00. This manual is designed to demystify the criminal justice system for health and social service professionals who work with the elderly and to encourage them to participate more fully in the criminal justice process.

Communities Uniting: Volunteers in Elder Abuse Prevention (1997, 24 pp) $15.00. This manual describes some of the contributions volunteers are currently making in the field of elder abuse prevention, recommends issues to consider in determining the need for volunteers, presents the fundamentals of volunteer management, describes available resources, and offers sample materials and tips from existing programs.

Domestic Violence and the Elderly: a Cross Training Curriculum in Elder Abuse and Domestic Violence. (1998). $15.00 This is a training curriculum for service providers in both aging and domestic violence to train them on issues around older battered women. It includes basic information on domestic violence, sexual assault, elder abuse, and aging. While this curriculum was developed for the San Francisco community, it can be easily adapted for other communities.

Serving the Older Battered Woman: A Conference Planning Guide (1997, 59 pp + appendices). $28.00. This guide to planning and conducting a conference for community professionals from the fields of aging, domestic violence, law enforcement, health care, and legal services provides instruction in:

Introducing both domestic violence and elder abuse
The interface between domestic violence and elder abuse
Conducting interdisciplinary workshops
Developing a "blueprint" for serving older battered women
Financial Abuse of the Elderly (1996, 28 pp). $15.00. Of all forms of elder abuse, financial exploitation may be the most difficult to grasp because the problem itself is poorly defined. Evaluating whether or not financial abuse has occurred often involves complex and subjective determinations. This manual provides an overview of the problem, describes the challenges it poses, and profiles promising intervention strategies.

Older Battered Women: Integrating Aging and Domestic Violence Services (1996, 28 pp). $15.00. For many years elderly battered women have fallen between the cracks of the elder abuse and domestic violence systems. This manual, intended for domestic violence advocates and service providers who work with the elderly, takes a step toward rectifying the situation by describing the service needs of the older battered woman and profiling innovative programs around the country. It also provides a general introduction to domestic violence.

Building Partnerships: A Guide to Developing Coalitions, Interagency Agreements and Teams in the Field of Elder Abuse (1995, 24 pp) $15.00. This guide provides practical advice in how to promote partnerships among those who share a common interest in protecting the health, safety, property, and civil liberties of the elderly.

To Reach Beyond Our Grasp: A Community Outreach Guide for Professionals in the Field of Elder Abuse (1995, 20 pp). $15.00. This manual looks at culture, tradition, values, and language to understand the mistreatment of elders in a broader and increasingly diverse community.

For more information, or to order materials, contact:
The San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention
Institute on Aging
2700 Geary Boulevard San Francisco, CA 94118
(415) 447-1989, X513
email: elderabuseprevention@ioaging.org
Website: http://www.ioaging.org

National Adult Protective Services Administrators (NAAPSA)

The National Adult Protective Services Administrators (NAPSA) is a membership organization established in the mid-1980s. Its mission is to improve the quality and availability of services for disabled and at-risk adults and elderly persons who are abused, neglected, or exploited, and other vulnerable adults who are unable to protect their own interests. This is accomplished through advocacy at the national level and by assisting state and local administrators secure technical assistance, develop resources, and educate the public and legislative bodies about the needs of dependent adults. Membership is available to APS administrators at the state and local level and their staff; administrators of public agencies and organizations that exhibits an interest in APS and the objectives of NAPSA; and agencies involved in the provision of APS or interested in the objectives of NAPSA.Membership benefits include a newsletter, membership directory, and an annual conference.

NAPSA has produced the following publications:

A National Study of Self-Neglecting Adult Protective Services Clients.(1991, 30 pp). National Association of Adult Protective Service Administrators. Includes information collected from 30 states, profiles self-neglecting clients referred to APS, and includes a discussion implications.

Adult Protective Services Compilation of Workload Studies and Caseload Data (1997, 9 pp). National Association of Adult Protective Service Administrators. Data from 26 APS programs. Provides recommended caseloads, current average caseloads, and average length of time APS cases are open, as well as a list of state contacts.

Report by the Adult Services Task Force on the Perspective of the States on a Federal Adult Protective Services Statute (1995, 143 pp). National Association of Adult Protective Service Administrators. Includes APS eligibility issues, services to be included in a model federal APS statute, service access and reporting issues, service delivery and coordination issues, funding and administration, and survey respondents. Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia participated in the survey.

A National Study of Involuntary Protective Services to Adult Protective Services Clients (1993, 42 pp):This study presents information derived from 42 states on providing protective services without the consent of the client. The survey found that although most states have the ability to provide involuntary services, over 90% of APS clients consent to services.

For more information or to purchase materials, contact:
National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA)
Joanne Otto, Executive Director
1900 13th Street
Suite 303
Boulder, CO 80302
Phone: (720) 565-0906
Fax: (720) 565-0438
E-Mail: joanne.otto@naapsa.org

National Association of Bunco Investigators (NABI)

The National Association of Bunco Investigators, Inc. is a non-profit organization of law enforcement and associated professionals dedicated to the investigation and apprehension of con artists and transient criminals. Members have developed extensive knowledge in the investigation of Bunco crimes, which include pigeon drops, bank examiner schemes, sweetheart scams, etc. NABI facilitates the continuous exchange of information by publishing a bulletin, which provides up to date information on criminals. It also provides a forum for the dissemination of information on suspects wanted by law enforcement agencies around the country. To date, the information disseminated through NABI has helped in the identification of over 2,000 criminal suspects.

For more information, contact:
NABI
P.O. Box 287
Maryland Line, MD 21105

National Association of State Units on Aging

NASUA serves as lead agency in the National Center on Elder Abuse (see produces and disseminates information on domestic and institutional elder abuse, publishes a monthly newsletter, and operates a website, which includes basic information, a publications list, frequently asked questions, and linkages to NCEA partners and other organizations involved in elder abuse prevention. NASUA has produced the following materials:

Fact Sheets
Types of abuse in domestic settings
Trends in abuse in domestic settings
Reporting abuse in domestic settings
Older battered women fact sheet
Institutional Abuse Training Resources (1998, 4 pp). Annotated bibliography of elder abuse training resources (including videos and training manuals) relevant to professionals and paraprofessionals working in institutional settings.
States Keep the Dream Alive: Elder Rights and Minority Initiatives (1997, 142 pp). Thirty-three states' three most effective and/or important legislative and programmatic elder rights and minority efforts.
Structure and Utilization of Adult Abuse Registries in Selected States (1997, 57 pp). Discusses scope, due process, employers' checking mandates, registry management, and issues and ideas related to adult abuse registries, using examples from nine states. Appendices include some sample forms.
Summaries of the Statistical Data on Elder Abuse in Domestic Settings for FY95 and FY96 (1997, 33 pp)
Getting Out...The Word (1994 to 1998, 23 pp) Set of nine elder abuse public education "tip sheets" covering: how to deal with media requests to interview a victim; linking elder abuse education efforts to current events; peer resources; radio PSAs; domestic violence awareness month; dealing with television reporters; communicating accessibly; handling public appearances; and using roleplays.
Elder Abuse and State Courts (Teleconference Report) (1996, 29 pp)
Elder Abuse Registries (Teleconference Report) (1995, 11 pp)
Addressing Elder Abuse with American Indian Tribes (Teleconference Report) (1995, 17 pp)
Confidentiality Dilemmas (Roundtable Discussion) (1994, 11 pp)
Training Bankers about Financial Exploitation (Teleconference Report) (1994, 5 pp) Joining the Anti-Violence/Family Violence Campaigns (Teleconference Report) (1994, 8 pp) Training Law Enforcement Professionals about Elder Abuse (Teleconference report) (1994, 6 pp)
Elder Abuse: Questions and Answers -- An Information Guide for Professionals and Concerned Citizens (1996 [sixth edition], 28 pp) This publication is designed to help professionals working with older people to enhance their awareness of the problem of abuse, neglect and exploitation of America's elderly. It provides basic information in a question and answer format, including: the origins, causes and incidence of elder abuse on both the national and state levels; victim and perpetrator characteristics; and an explanation of the services available to victims, families and at-risk elders. This publication was originally developed and printed under grant #90-AM-0332 from the Administration on Aging to the American Public Welfare Association. Also available in Spanish.
Inventory of Elder Abuse Coordination Projects (1995, approx. 100 pp). Indexed descriptions of 57 elder abuse coordination projects, including agencies involved, project dates, problem the project was designed to address, goals and target audience(s), activities, and contact person.
Elder Abuse Video Resources: A Guide for Training and Education (1995, 107 pp). This guide is a resource for staff training and public education on elder abuse. It provides a listing of videos reviewed by Center staff up to Spring of 1995. The descriptions contain a summary of the content, suggested target audience(s), format, length, price and information about where and how to obtain the video.
Elder Abuse Training Priorities: Targets, Opportunities, and Strategies: Highlights of a National Survey and Recommendations of Two Expert Panels (1993, 130 pp). Results and recommendations resulting from a survey of 101 elder abuse and legal services professionals and 166 "related professionals" such as physicians, law enforcement officers, and bankers) of their elder abuse training needs.
NARCEA Exchange FrontLine articles
2a: Interviewing Sexual Abuse Victims with Developmental Disabilities (1991)
2b: Banks and Their Responsibilities to Report Financial Exploitation (1991)
2c: Working with Abuse Victims with Developmental Disabilities (1991)
2d: Legal Authorities for APS Practice (1990)
2e: Financial Abuse and Legal Assistance (1990)
2f: Networking with Physicians (1990)
2g: Working with the Criminal Justice System (1990)
2h: Assessment and Intervention (1989)
"The Vexing Problem of Elder Abuse," Public Welfare (1988, 44 pp). A feature issue of Public Welfare, the Journal of the American Public Welfare Association, this compilation of articles examines the problem of elder abuse and neglect from the diverse perspectives of practitioners, law makers and the academic community. It includes a retrospective of national elder abuse policy evolution (up to 1988) and compares some of the important issues in the elder abuse field with those in child abuse. The inherent tensions between individual rights and societal responsibility for protection of vulnerable persons is discussed.
Contact:
National Association of State Units on Aging
1225 I Street, N.W., Suite 725
Washington, D.C. 20005
Telephone: (202) 898-2578
email: NCEA@nasua.org

National Center for Victims of Crime

The National Center for Victims of Crime is resource and advocacy center for victims of crime. Among the issues the center has advocated for is greater attention to victims of financial crime and abuse. The Center's affiliate Bar Association provides referrals to attorneys with expertise in representing crime victims. They also provide training and assistance to lawyers including access to a computerized database of over 11,000 civil appellate cases and court decisions concerning crime victims, a network of expert witnesses and consultants, and two publications--Crime Liability Monthly and the Victim Advocate.

For more information, contact:
National Center for Victims of Crime
2111 Wilson Blvd. Suite 300
Arlington, VA 22201
Phone: (703) 276-2880
Fax: (703) 276-2889
Website: http://www.ncvc.org/main/main.htm

National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA)

The National Center on Elder Abuse was established in 1993 to provide information, data, and expertise to federal, state and local agencies, professionals, and the public. It is operated as a partnership between six organizations, with the National Association of State Units on Aging (NASUA) serving as the lead agency. Other partners in NCEA include the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA); the Clearinghouse on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE), operated by the College of Human Resources of the University of Delaware; the San Francisco Consortium for Elder Abuse Prevention at the Goldman Institute on Aging; the National Association of Adult Protective Service Administrators; and the Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly of the American Bar Association. See sections on individual partners for more information.

Contact:
National Center on Elder Abuse
1225 I Street, N.W., Suite 725
Washington, D.C. 20005
Telephone: (202) 898-2578
email: NCEA@nasua.org
Website: http://www.elderabusecenter.org

The National Clearinghouse on Domestic Violence in Later Life

Operated by the Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence, this resource center provides materials and technical assistance on domestic violence in later life. Among the publications they produce, are the following:

Elder Abuse (including domestic violence in later life): Potential Legal Remedies. This booklet provides information about potential criminal justice and civil actions to assist victims of elder abuse and the professionals that work with them.

Elder Abuse, Neglect, and Family Violence: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Provides general information about elder abuse, a flow chart to respond to suspected abuse, and specific tips on what health care providers can do. It lists common signs and symptoms, answers commonly asked questions, and identifies interventions.

Safety Planning for Victims of Domestic Abuse. A brochure for domestic abuse victims of any age who may be abused by or afraid of their spouse/partner; boy/girlfriend; adult child or other family member. It provides instruction in planning for safety in advance of potentially dangerous situations.

Financial Safety Planning for Older Women. This publication addresses the financial obstacles that prevent battered older women from leaving abusive relationships and how to overcome those obstacles.

Developing Services for Older Abuse Women A Guide for Domestic Abuse Programs (1997). This publication, intended for domestic violence advocates, describes the special service needs of battered older women.

For more information and instructions in how to order publications, contact:
The Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence
307 South Paterson, Suite #1
Madison, WI 53703
Phone:(608)255-0539
Fax:(608)255-3560
Email: wcadv@inxpress.net (Subject line: NCALL)

National Organization of Triads, Inc (NATI)

National Association of Triads, Inc. (NATI) provides advice, support, technical assistance, and training to local Triads. Created in 1988 as a partnership between the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), Triad is a network of local programs that promote collaboration between senior volunteers and law enforcement. At present, approximately 730 counties have Triads. Local Triads are overseen by Salt (Senior and Law Enforcement Together) councils, which plan activities and programs to address local needs. NATI hosts training events and a national conference, manages a speaker's bureau, and produces a quarterly newsletter. It distributes guidebooks, information packets, and an informational video on how to get started.

For more information, contact:
NATI
1450 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 800-424-7827
Fax: 703-519-8567
website: http://www.sheriffs.org/triad.htm

National Long Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center

The National Long Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center supports the development and operation of long-term care ombudsman programs across the country through technical assistance, consultation, and information dissemination. It also facilitates communication about timely issues, program needs, and resources among state ombudsman programs and assists states in promoting public awareness about ombudsman programs.

Contact:
National Long Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center
c/o National Citizen's Coalition for Nursing Home Reform
1424 16th Street NW, Suite 202
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 332-2275
Fax: (202) 332-2949
Website: http://www.nccnhr.org/

 

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